Polling

Hart Research Associates

January 2015:  Support for a Federal Minimum Wage of $12.50 or Above

  • 75 percent of Americans support raising the federal minimum wage to $12.50 by 2020, including
    • 92 percent of Democrats
    • 73 percent of Independents
    • 53 percent of Republicans
  • 63 percent of Americans support an even greater federal minimum wage increase to $15.00 by 2020
  • 71 percent of Americans favor raising tipped workers' minimum wage to the overall minimum wage an even greater federal minimum wage increase to $15.00 by 2020
  • 82 percent of Americans support automatic upward annual adjustments to the federal minimum wage

NELP Press Release on Hart Research poll:  New Poll Shows Overwhelming support for Major Minimum Wage Increase

Victoria Research

October 2015:  National Poll of Workers Paid Less Than $15 per Hour (conducted on behalf of the National Employment Law Project)

  • 75 percent support a $15 minimum wage and a union
  • 72 percent approve of labor unions
  • 69 percent say it should be easier for workers like themselves to join together and form a union
  • 72 percent believe unions can make a real difference in whether or not workers like themselves get raises
  • 66 percent say they would have a better chance of making $15 an hour and being able to support their families if they could join a union
  • Support for $15 and a union is particularly strong in the South: 77 percent of Southern respondents expressed support
  • 69 percent of unregistered respondents say they would register to vote if there were a presidential candidate who supports raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour and making it easier for workers to join a union
  • 65 percent of registered voters say they are more likely to vote if a candidate supports $15 and a union for all workers
  • 69 percent of respondents favor raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour

Oxfam America/McLaughlin & Associates

September 2015:  New Poll Shows Political Benefits to Supporting a Federal Minimum Wage Increase in 2016 Election

  • In early primaries and caucuses, there are few benefits to running against an increase in the federal minimum wage. Less than 13% of likely GOP early caucus or primary voters in Iowa and New Hampshire oppose an increase in the federal minimum wage, and say they would not vote for a presidential candidate who supports an increase. In fact, a majority of New Hampshire GOP primary and Iowa GOP Caucus voters support at least one proposal (among $9, $10, $12 or $15) to increase the federal minimum wage (58% in Iowa and 59% in New Hampshire).

  • In a general election, there are many benefits to supporting an increase in the federal minimum wage. By greater than a 3 to 1 ratio (64% to 18%), nearly two-thirds are more likely to vote for a candidate who supports increasing the minimum wage. A candidate will attract over 46% more voters than they will alienate. The net attraction score is strong among key voter segments: Independents (+45), women (+53), under 40 (+57), non-college educated men (+60) and non-college educated women (+56).

  • Increasing the federal minimum wage is clearly a winning issue in general election swing states. Eighty-seven percent of general election voters support at least one proposal for a federal minimum wage increase. The big majorities cut across party lines: Republicans (77%), Democratic (97%) and Independent (87%). Proposals for minimum wage increases to $9, $10, $12 and $15, all received support of 50% or higher among the voters in the swing states.

  • Large numbers of voters say that they or a family member would benefit from increasing the federal minimum wage to $12, and they strongly favor an increase. Roughly 41% of voters in swing states report that they or a family member’s personal financial situation would improve if the federal minimum wage were raised to $12. Candidates who support a wage increase net an enormous 78 points of support from these voters in a general election. Those affected almost universally support at least one proposal to increase the federal minimum wage (96%). Even in the GOP primary, voters reporting that they or a family member would benefit from an increase are much more likely to vote for a candidate supporting an increase than to oppose such a candidate (+38 points).

  • 71 percent of Americans support a federal minimum wage increase to $9.00 per hour, including 87 percent of Democrats, 68 percent of Independents, and 50 percent of Republicans.

  • 73 percent of likely 2012 voters support raising the federal minimum wage to $10 per hour, including 91 percent of Democrats, 74 percent of Independents, and 50 percent of Republicans.

  • 80 percent of voters in New York support raising the state's minimum wage to $8.75 per hour, including 95 percent of Democrats, 77 percent of Independents, and 61 percent of Republicans.

Quinnipiac

September 2015: New York State Voters Back $15 Minimum Wage

  • New York State voters support 62 - 35 percent raising the state's minimum wage to $15 per hour over the next several years.

  • There is strong support from every party, gender, age and regional group except Republicans, who oppose the idea 65 - 32 percent, and upstate voters who are divided with 50 percent in favor and 47 percent.

  • Support is 85 - 13 percent among Democrats, 59 - 38 percent among independent voters, 77 - 21 percent among New York City voters and 61 - 36 percent among suburban voters.

Field Poll

August 2015:  Support for $15 state minimum wage gives huge boost to organized labor (Sacramento Business Journal)

  • 68 percent of California voters support a $15 state minimum wage
  • 47 percent "strongly support" a California $15 state minimum wage

Pew Research

February 2013: Public Support for Raising the Federal Minimum Wage

Lake Research Partners

February 2012: Public Support for Raising the Minimum Wage - Full Report

June 7, 2011 Memo: The Economics and Public Support of the Minimum Wage

New York Minimum Wage Poll

January 2013: New Yorkers Support Raising the State's Minimum Wage (Quinnipiac)

Illinois Minimum Wage Poll

Polling Memo

Polling Data

Maryland Minimum Wage Poll

Polling Memo

Polling Data

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