New York Poll Press Release

SURVEY FINDS STRONG SUPPORT FOR INCREASES IN THE MINIMUM WAGE, PAID SICK DAYS, AND LIVING WAGES AMONG NEW YORKERS

NEW YORK CITY, NY, MAY 24, 2011: Findings were released today from a recent survey on the opinions of a large, diverse, and representative sample of New Yorkers conducted by Baruch College Survey Research at the School of Public Affairs at Baruch College of the City University of New York (CUNY). The poll of close to 1200 New Yorkers was carried out by a team of academics and polling experts directed by Professor Doug Muzzio and Professor Micheline Blum to explore the opinions of New Yorkers on a range of relevant policy and public affairs issues. This report focuses on the opinions of New York City residents on matters regarding the minimum wage, paid sick days, and living wages.

The results of the survey indicate that New Yorkers overwhelmingly support:

  • Raising the minimum wage from the current $7.25 an hour to $10 by 2012 and adjusting it to the cost of living every year with 88% in favor and 9% opposed.
  • Requiring employers to give all workers at least 5 paid sick days per year with 89% in favor and 8% opposed.
  • Requiring employers that receive taxpayer-funded city subsidies to pay $10 an
  • hour plus health benefits with 78% in favor and 15% opposed.

The report discusses breakdowns of the data on each question by a number of demographic and other relevant characteristics. The study finds that there is very strong support for the three policy proposals across all gender categories, age groups, ethnic and racial categories, income groups, educational levels, employment categories, area of residence, voting behavior, and political affiliation. Professor Hector Cordero-Guzman, the author of the report, commented: “I think everyone has been somewhat surprised by the magnitude, strength, and timing of the support for these three policy proposals. As the economy struggles to improve, it looks like New Yorkers know micro- and macro-economics better than most people give them credit for. They seem to be clearly saying that they believe putting more money in workers pockets and improving worker access to health benefits is the best economic stimulant…”

The FactsThe Facts

$10.74

How much the federal minimum wage would be if it had kept up with inflation over the past 40 years. Instead, itís $7.25. Learn More

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